Because Everyone Sleeps 2019, Sawtooth

  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Because Everyone Sleeps, 2019, Sawtooth, installation view, Because Everyone Sleeps 2019, Sawtooth, installation view
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Because Everyone Sleeps, 2019, Sawtooth, installation view, Because Everyone Sleeps 2019, Sawtooth, installation view
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Scoop, 2019, oil on linen Scoop 2019, oil on linen , 30 x 30cm
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Lull (left), Floating (right), 2019, oil on linenLull (left), Floating (right) 2019, oil on linen, 30 x 30cm
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Fracture, 2019, oil on linenFracture 2019, oil on linen, 30 x 30cm
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Because Everyone Sleeps, 2019, Because Everyone Sleeps 2019, 2019, Sawtooth, installation view
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Fog, 2019, oil on linenFog 2019, oil on linen, 30 x 30cm
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Because Everyone Sleeps, 2019, Sawtooth, installation view, Because Everyone Sleeps 2019, Sawtooth, installation view
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : All in the Stars, 2017, oil on canvas All in the Stars 2017, oil on canvas , 40 x 45cm

Because Everyone Sleeps

Curated by Ciara O’Meara

How do societies and their cultures affect the materiality of dreams? In what way can these influences be creatively depicted?

Sleep is a platform for dreams and lends itself as a window into an altered reality. Dreams exist in a subjective realm, although, in the context of cultural practice the manifestation and content of a dream can be perceived in a myriad of ways.

“...The Ancient Greek was ‘visited’ by a dream, whereas the modern Frenchman ‘makes’ a dream...” (Meier, Je Fait Un Réve)

Among cultures, the importance of dreams and their concepts differ substantially. In certain societies dreams are viewed as fanciful creations and can be regarded as meaningless within the conscious, waking state. On the contrary, particular cultures respect dreams as important origins for communication, spirituality and identity.

Currently, can politics, society and culture be influenced by the subjective dream? How does acculturation warp or shift the content of a dream? Have cultures fatigued the notion of the dream to emphasise culture itself? Unintentionally, can a dreamer apply their dream experience to the boundaries of a cultural model?

Individually and culturally what is the cause, the meaning and the use of a dream? And how can a dream be materialised, physically?

“...To sleep perchance to dream...” (Shakespeare, Hamlet)