Suburbia 2018, Cement Fondu

  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Somewhere in the Middle, 2018, Somewhere in the Middle 2018, oil on linen on doors, Tas oak, brass hardware, rubber feet, garden hose, oil on plywood, dimensions variable, photograph by Document Photography
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Suburbia, 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, Suburbia 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, photograph by Document Photography
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Suburbia, , Suburbia, 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, photograph by Document Photography
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Suburbia, 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, Suburbia 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, photograph by Document Photography
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Suburbia, 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, Suburbia 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, photograph by Document Photography
  • Amber Koroluk-Stephenson : Suburbia, , Suburbia, 2018, installation view, Cement Fondu, photograph by Document Photography

Suburbia, curated by Megan Monte and Josephine Skinner

Cement Fondu's inaugural group exhibition, Suburbia, including work by Daata Editions with Ed Fornieles, Rosie Deacon, Chris Dolman, Caroline Garcia, Tina Havelock Stephens, Biljana Janice, Amber Koroluk-Stephensen, Kenny Pittock, Thom Roberts and Daniel Kim, Studio A with Emily Crockford, Shahmen Suku, Sweatshop Western Sydney Literacy Movement, Tangentyere Artists: Nerine Tilmouth; Louise Daniels; and Elizabeth Namptitjinpa, Gary Trinh, Amalia Ulman, and Paul Yore.

Suburbia breaches the boundaries of the backyard by unpacking issues embedded deep in the heart of suburban existence – cultural identity, colonisation, social conformity, migration, Australiana, the body and the home. Artists engage a broad spectrum of art forms to tell their stories, including needle-point embroidery, live performance, painting, spoken word, ceramics, installation and digital media. The exhibition challenges audiences to think more expansively about suburbia as something that it is not simply place-based but experiential; ideological, shedding presumptions and prejudices about life in the ‘burbs.

This project was assisted through Arts Tasmania by the Minister for the Arts.